Math Biology Journal Club

Paper to read: Product-Form Stationary Distributions for Deficiency Zero Chemical Reaction Networks. David F. Anderson, Gheorghe Craciun, and Thomas G. Kurtz. Bulletin of Mathematical Biology (2010) 72: 1947–1970. 

Link, https://www.dropbox.com/s/iu2mb20u8zaqcc8/Anderson.Craciun.Kurtz_2010_BullMathBiol.pdf?dl=0

Date: 
Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Location: 
945 Patterson Office Tower
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Executive Committee Meeting

Cancelled

Date: 
Tuesday, December 8, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Executive Committee Meeting

Date: 
Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Executive Committee Meeting

Date: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Executive Committee Meeting

Date: 
Tuesday, October 6, 2015 - 3:30pm to 4:00pm
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Convergence, Divergence & Reverse Engineering Power Laws

Landform and landscape evolution may be convergent, whereby initial differences and irregularities are (on average) reduced and smoothed, or divergent, with increasing variation and irregularity. Convergent and divergent evolution are directly related to dynamical (in)stability. Unstable interactions among geomorphic system components tend to dominate in earlier stages of development, while stable limits often become dominant in later stages. This results in mode switching, from unstable, divergent to stable, convergent development. Divergent-to-convergent mode switches emerge from a common structure in many geomorphic systems: mutually reinforcing or competitive interrelationships among system components, and negative self-effects limiting individual components. When the interactions between components are dominant, divergent evolution occurs. As threshold limits to divergent development are approached, self-limiting effects become more important, triggering a switch to convergence. The mode shift is an emergent phenomenon, arising from basic principles of threshold modulation and gradient selection.

"Wired Walk" - UK Libraries Exhibit on Kentucky's African American LGBTQ Community

An exhibition on LGBTQ members of the African-American community in the Commonwealth from University of Kentucky Special Collections and Research Center (SCRC) is on display at the Lexington Public Library Gallery (downtown Lexington). The public can view "A Pictorial History of African American Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Persons in Kentucky" through Sept. 27.

Meet several Wired peer mentors in the lobby of CC2 at 7:30 PM to walk to the Lexington Public Library to view the exhibit.  This will count as a Wired event!

Date: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Lexington Public Library - Meet in CC2 Lobby to walk together!

Poetry Reading by Dr. Frank X Walker

Come join the LEXengaged Living Learning Program at this event where Frank X Walker, one of the Wired Faculty Directors, will be reading from his book Isaac Murphy: I Dedicate This Ride

In this richly imagined collection of poems, Frank X Walker brings to life the mind and heart of legendary African-American jockey Isaac Burns Murphy (1861-1896). The son of a slave, Murphy rose to the top of thoroughbred racing in a brilliant career that brought him wealth, honor and international fame. The first to win the Kentucky Derby three times (1884, 1890, 1891), Murphy won an unprecedented 44% of the races he entered. Part of the lore surrounding Murphy's legacy was his penchant for not using the whip. He preferred to ride his mounts into the winner's circle by using his well-honed skills and simply talking to his horses.

This will count as a Wired event, and refreshments will be served!!

 

Date: 
Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
President's Room - Singletary Center for the Arts

Circular Reasoning

Scientists, including geographers and geoscientists, are easily seduced by repeated forms and patterns in nature. This is not surprising, as our mission is to detect and explain patterns in nature, ideally arising from some unifying underlying law or principle. Further, in the case of geography and Earth sciences, spatial patterns and form-process relationships are paramount.

Unfortunately, the recurrence of similar shapes, forms, or patterns may not tell us much. Over the years we have made much of, e.g. logarithmic spirals, Fibonacci sequences, fractal geometry, and power-law distributions—all of which recur in numerous phenomena—only to learn that they don’t necessarily tell us anything, other than that several different phenomena or causes can lead to the same form or pattern. The phenomenon whereby different processes, causes, or histories can lead to similar outcomes is called equifinality.

Center pivot irrigation in Kansas, USA (USGS photo).

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