Physics and Astronomy Colloquium: End of the Road? A Possible Future for Transportation.

This talk will discuss energy resources, options for portable fuels for transportation needs, and requirements and limitations of a practical automobile powered by electricity. Battery development is a significant obstacle--nature does not always give us what we want. A new model for transportation will be proposed that uses the electric cars we already have to solve our transportation issues--without having to wait for a breakthrough in battery chemistry.

Refreshments will be served in CP179 at 3:15pm

Date: 
Friday, October 30, 2015 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
CP155

An Evening with Chris Green

Chris Green will be speaking to the LEXengaged Community, and the Wired Community is invited to join them! 

Chris grew up in the thoroughbred racing industry with his grandfather being one of Keeneland’s founders.  He went to UK while working in the horse industry, but didn’t complete his degree until he was in his thirties and then went on to University of Virginia’s law school.  He practices law in the New York area and is particularly committed to social justice work.  He is devoted to education and to a liberal arts education in particular. 

For more information about Chris, please go to http://www.bsfllp.com/lawyers/data/0058.

To get credit for a Wired event, please post a response to the lecture on our Wired LLP 2015-2016 Facebook group!!

 

 

 

 

Date: 
Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
Bingham-Davis House - 218 E. Maxwell Street

Astro Seminar: Stellar Disruption by a Super-Massive Black Hole in the Multi-Wavelength Era

Most galaxies harbor weakly- or non-active central super-massive black holes (BHs). Roughly once every 10^4 - 10^5 years in each galaxy, a star enters the BH's tidal disruption radius within which the tidal force of the BH exceeds the star's self gravity, and hence the star gets tidally disrupted. In these so-called tidal disruption events (TDEs), the stellar debris feeds a burst of super-Eddington accretion that generates a bright flare of electromagnetic radiation. In the recent ~ 10 years, several dozen such flares have been discovered by transient surveys in various wavelengths from gamma/X-ray to UV and optical, and ~ 10 of them have optical spectra. In addition, the discoveries of Sw J1644+57 and Sw J2058+05 showed that the TDE accretion disk can launch relativistic jets, and these events are called jetted TDEs.

TDEs offer a new window of studying many astrophysical puzzles, such as super-Eddington MHD accretion physics, population of non-active super-massive BHs in the universe, composition and radiation mechanism of relativistic jets, etc. I'll talk about a few ongoing works with my advisor and collaborators. (1) If a relativistic jet is launched from the accretion disk, the electrons in the jet will inverse-Compton scatter external photons from the disk. We calculated the inverse-Compton luminosity and found it consistent with the X-ray observations from the jetted TDE Sw J2058+05. (2) A typical TDE emits about 10^51 - 10^52 erg of UV/optical energy, which will most likely be absorbed by pc-scale dust at the galactic center. Dust grains will re-radiate this energy in the mid-IR at a luminosity of 10^42 - 10^43 erg/s. Observations and applications of this mid-IR component will be discussed. (3) From the ~ 10 TDE candidates with optical spectra, but we see a large diversity of emission and absorption lines. We study the line formation physics in these spectra and have drawn some general conclusions about the gas properties (e.g. density, temperature and mass).

Date: 
Thursday, November 5, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
CP179

Physics Colloquium: Seach for New Physics with Atoms and Molecules

Recent advances in both experimental and theoretical atomic, molecular, and optical physics provide remarkable new opportunities for precision measurements and tests of fundamental physics, including searches for permanent electric-dipole moments, parity violation studies, searches for variation of fundamental constants, testing gravity and searching for gravitational waves, tests of local Lorentz invariance and the Einstein equivalence principle and many others. I will give a systematic overview of searches for new physics with atoms and molecules, recent key results, and highlight select future proposals.

Date: 
Friday, November 6, 2015 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
CP155

Special Seminar: Tests of Lorentz Symmetry with Atomic Systems

Lorentz symmetry is one of the cornerstones of modern physics. However, a number of theories aiming at unifying gravity with other fundamental interactions including string field theory suggest violation of Lorentz symmetry. While the energy scale of such strongly Lorentz symmetry-violating physics is much higher than that currently attainable by particle accelerators, Lorentz violation (LV) may nevertheless be detectable via precision measurements at low energies. I will give an overview of such tests with atomic systems, describing the most recent experiment with trapped Ca+ ions in more detail. I will also discuss a systematic study of LV sensitivities in atomic systems that identified ytterbium ion as an idea system with high sensitivity as well as excellent experimental controllability. By applying quantum information inspired technology to Yb+, we expect tests of LLI violating physics in the electron-photon sector to reach levels of 10-23, five orders of magnitude more sensitive than the current best bounds.

Date: 
Friday, November 6, 2015 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
CP179

Year of Europe: Intersections of Violence in Latin America, Panel Discussion

As the third session in The Intersections of Violence in Latin America, three distinguished scholars speak about their work on violence:

Rosa Linda Fregoso is a professor of Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her areas of specialization are femenicide, gender and racial violence, media and visual arts, and cultural politics in the Americas. Her publications include many single authored and co-edited volumes such as Terrorizing Women: Femenicide in the Americas, MeXicana Encounters: The Making of Social Identities on the Borderlands, and The Bronze Screen: Chicana and Chicano Film Culture. Cecilia Menjivar is currently a foundation distinguished professor in the department of sociology at the University of Kansas. She specializes in immigration, gender, violence, social networks, and religious institutions in the US and Latin America (particularly Central America). She has written over 90 articles and book chapters as well as six books, including Enduring Violence: Ladina Women’s Lives in Guatemala and Fragmented Ties: Salvadoran Immigrant Networks in America, both of which have received numerous awards. She is also currently the Vice President of the American Sociological Association.

Tiffiny Tung is the Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of Graduate Studies in Anthropology at Vanderbilt University. She is the director of the Beringa Bioarchaeology and Archaeology Project in the Majes Valley in Arequipa, Peru. Her areas of specialization include paleopathology, violence related trauma, the use of body and body parts in rituals, bioarchaeology of imperialism, and bioarchaeological perspectives on embodiment. Her book is called Violence, Ritual, and the Wari Empire: A Social Bioarchaeology of Imperialism in the Ancient Andes.

Special Seminar: Synchotron Radiation: Shining a Bright Light on Matter

Fred will present an introduction to synchrotron radiation and its unique properties, which arise from Maxwell’s Equations. He will discuss technology of light sources, beamlines, and experimental techniques.

He will present an example of an experiment: the search for quantum chaos in doubly excited states of the helium atom. The result reflects on the transition from a quantum description of matter on an atomic scale to a classical description on a planetary scale.

***********************

Dr. Schlachter is a physicist employed as a consultant and policy analyst by the American Physical Society following his retirement from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He was co-author of a 2008 APS report on energy efficiency; he wrote the chapter on transportation. He has since published several articles on batteries and electric cars, including pieces in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and APS News.

Date: 
Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
CP179

Condensed Matter Seminar: Skyrmion charge, non-commutative momenta, and Hall transport"

Date: 
Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
CP179
Tags/Keywords:

Algebra and Geometry Seminar

Title:  The Word Problem for the Brauer Group
 
Abstract:  By the renown Merkurjev-Suslin Theorem, the Brauer group of a field is generated by symbol algebras.  This gives rise to the word problem - given two ``words" (i.e. tensor products of symbol algebras), one should like to determine whether they represent the same element in the group or not.  One way to approach this problem is to come up with a way of producing all the equivalent words to one given word.  We shall discuss the special case of quaternion algebras and present some new results.
Date: 
Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Location: 
POT 745

The Silent Woman

A new play by Lydia Blaisdell will have its world premiere in Lexington Nov. 5–7, in four performances at the Downtown Arts Center. The Silent Woman tells the strange, true tale of a painter living with an effigy of his ex-lover in 1919 Germany. The play won the biennial Prize for Women Playwrights from the Kentucky Women Writers Conference. “The Silent Woman is a deeply assured work, funny and strange and beautiful in turns. It will make a thrilling production," said acclaimed playwright Carson Kreitzer, who judged the competition. Blaisdell’s script depicts this risqué episode from the point of view of scullery maid Hulda, persuaded to serve as a ladies maid to the effigy. Independently produced by Eric Seale, in collaboration with Kentucky Women Writers Conference and the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, The Silent Woman features a top-notch cast of Kentucky actors whose names will be familiar to local theater audiences: Bethany Finley as the maid Hulda, Darius Fatemi as the painter Oskar, and Bob Singleton as the butler, the coachman who courts Hulda, and the policeman. Performance dates are Nov. 5 at 7:30 pm, Nov. 6 at 7:30 pm, and Nov. 7 and 2 pm and 7:30 pm. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for students, and $8 for students 15 minutes before curtain time. To purchase tickets call 859-425-2550 or visit online at lexingtonky.gov/dac. To arrange for the playwright to meet with any student groups attending the play, please contact KWWC director Julie Wrinn at 257-2874 or Julie.Wrinn@uky.edu.

Date: 
Thursday, November 5, 2015 (All day) to Saturday, November 7, 2015 (All day)
Location: 
The Downtown Arts Center

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